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September
23

Some Highlights

  • When it comes to selling your house, you want it to look its best inside and out so it catches the attention of buyers. A real estate professional can help you decide what to do to make that happen.
  • Focus on tasks that can make it inviting, show it's cared for, and boost your curb appeal.
  • Let's connect so you have advice on what you may want to do to get your house ready to sell this season.

*Source: Keeping Current Matters, Inc.

September
12

If you've been thinking of buying a home, you may have been watching what's happened with mortgage rates over the past year. It's true they've risen dramatically, but where will they go from here, especially as the market continues to slow?

As you think about your homeownership goals and decide if now's the time to make your move, the best place to turn to for that information is the professionals. Here's a summary of the latest mortgage rate forecasts from housing market experts.

Experts Project Mortgage Rates Will Stabilize

While mortgage rates continue to fluctuate due to ongoing inflationary pressures and economic uncertainty, experts project they'll start to stabilize in the months ahead. According to the latest projections, mortgage rates are expected to hover in the low to mid 5% range initially, and then potentially dip into the high 4% range by later next year (see chart below):

Expert Forecasts on Mortgage Rates | MyKCM

That could bring you some welcome relief. So far this year, mortgage rates have climbed over two percentage points due to the Federal Reserve's response to inflation, and that's made it more expensive to buy a home. And wondering if the rise in rates will continue is keeping some prospective buyers on the sidelines.

But now that experts say mortgage rates should stabilize, this gives you a bit more certainty about what they think the future holds, and that may help you feel more confident about your decision to buy a home.

Bottom Line

Whether you're looking to buy your first home, move up to a larger home, or even downsize, you need to know what's happening in the housing market so you can make the most informed decision possible. Let's connect to discuss your goals and determine the best plan for your move.

*Keeping Current Matters, Inc. 2022

August
31

One of the biggest questions people are asking right now is: what's happening with home prices? There are headlines about ongoing price appreciation, but at the same time, some sellers are reducing the price of their homes. That can feel confusing and makes it more difficult to get a clear picture.

Part of the challenge is that it can be hard to understand what experts are saying when the words they use sound similar. Let's break down the differences among those terms to help clarify what's actually happening today.

  • Appreciation is when home prices increase.
  • Depreciation is when home prices decrease.
  • Deceleration is when home prices continue to appreciate, but at a slower or more moderate pace.

Experts agree that, nationally, what we're seeing today is deceleration. That means home prices are appreciating, just not at the record-breaking pace they have over the past year. In 2021, data from CoreLogic tells us home prices appreciated by an average of 15% nationwide. And earlier this year, that appreciation was upward of 20%. This year, experts forecast home prices will appreciate at a decelerated pace of around 10 to 11%, on average.

The graph below uses the latest data from CoreLogic to help tell the story of how home prices are decelerating, but not depreciating so far this year.

What's Actually Happening with Home Prices Today? | MyKCM

As the green bars show, home prices appreciated between 19-20% year-over-year from January to March. But over the last few months, the pace of that appreciation has decelerated to 18%. This means price growth is still climbing compared to last year but at a slower rate.

As the Monthly Mortgage Monitor from Black Knight explains:

"Annual home price growth dropped by nearly two percentage points . . . the greatest single-month slowdown on record since at least the early 1970s. . . While June's slowdown was record-breaking, home price growth would need to decelerate at this pace for six more months to drive annual appreciation back to 5%, a rate more in line with long-run averages."

Basically, this means, while moderating, home prices are still far above the norm, and we'd have to see a lot more deceleration to even fall in line with more typical rates of home price growth. That's still not home price depreciation.

The big takeaway is home prices haven't fallen or depreciated nationwide, they're just decelerating or moderating. While some unique and overheated markets may see declines, nationally, home prices are forecast to appreciate. And when we look at the country as a whole, none of the experts project home prices will net depreciate or fall. They're all projecting ongoing appreciation.

Bottom Line

If you have questions about what's happening with home prices in our local area, let's connect. Give us a call today!

*Keeping Current Matters, Inc. 2022

August
30

If you're thinking about buying a home, you likely have a lot of factors on your mind. You're weighing your own needs against higher mortgage rates, today's home prices, and more to try to decide if you want to jump into the market. While some buyers may wait things out, there's a reason serious buyers are making moves right now, and that's the growing number of homes for sale.

So far this year, housing inventory has been increasing and that's making the prospect of finding your dream home less difficult. While there are always reasons you could delay making a big decision, there are also always reasons to consider moving forward. And having a growing number of options for your home search may be exactly what you needed to feel more confident in making a move.

What's Causing Housing Inventory To Grow?

As new data comes out, we're getting an updated picture of why housing supply is increasing so much this year. As Bill McBride, Author of Calculated Risk, explains:

"We are seeing a significant change in inventory, but no pickup in new listings. Most of the increase in inventory so far has been due to softer demand – likely because of higher mortgage rates."

Basically, the inventory growth is primarily from homes staying on the market a bit longer (known as active listings). And that's happening because higher mortgage rates and home prices have helped moderate the peak frenzy of buyer demand.

The graph below uses data from realtor.com to show how much active listings have risen over the past five months as a result (shown in green):

Why You May Want To Start Your Home Search Today | MyKCM

Why This Growth Is Good News for You

Regardless of the source, the increase in available housing supply is good for buyers. More housing supply actively for sale means you have more options as your search for your next home. A recent article from realtor.com explains just how significant the inventory growth has been and why it's good news for your plans to buy:

"Nationally, the inventory of homes actively for sale on a typical day in July increased by 30.7% over the past year, the largest increase in inventory in the data history and higher than last month's growth rate of 18.7% which was itself record-breaking. This amounted to 176,000 more homes actively for sale on a typical day in July compared to the previous year and more choice for buyers who are still looking for a new home."

The growth this year is certainly good news for you, especially if you've had trouble finding a home that meets your needs. If you start your search today, those additional options should make it less difficult to find a home than it would have been over the past two years.

Bottom Line

If you're ready to jump into the market and take advantage of the increasing supply of homes for sale, let's connect today. The opportunity is knocking, will you answer?

*Keeping Current Matters, Inc. 2022

August
22

Some Highlights

  • If you're buying a home, here's what you should know about your home inspection and why it's so important.
  • A home inspection is a crucial step in the homebuying process. It assesses the condition of the home you plan to purchase so you can avoid costly surprises down the road.
  • Let's connect so you have an expert on your side to guide you through the process.

*Source: Keeping Current Matters, Inc. 2022

August
12

Whether you're a potential homebuyer, seller, or both, you probably want to know: will home prices fall this year? Let's break down what's happening with home prices, where experts say they're headed, and why this matters for your homeownership goals.

Last Year's Rapid Home Price Growth Wasn't the Norm

In 2021, home prices appreciated quickly. One reason why is that record-low mortgage rates motivated more buyers to enter the market. As a result, there were more people looking to make a purchase than there were homes available for sale. That led to competitive bidding wars which drove prices up. CoreLogic helps explain how unusual last year's appreciation was:

"Price appreciation averaged 15% for the full year of 2021, up from the 2020 full year average of 6%."

In other words, the pace of appreciation in 2021 far surpassed the 6% the market saw in 2020. And even that appreciation was greater than the pre-pandemic norm which was typically around 3.8%. This goes to show, 2021 was an anomaly in the housing market spurred by more buyers than homes for sale.

Home Price Appreciation Moderates Today

This year, home price appreciation is slowing (or decelerating) from the feverish pace the market saw over the past two years. According to the latest forecasts, experts say on average, nationwide, prices will still appreciate by roughly 10% in 2022 (see graph below):

What Does the Rest of the Year Hold for Home Prices? | MyKCM

Why do all of these experts agree prices will continue to rise? It's simple. Even though the housing supply is growing today, it's still low overall thanks to several factors, including a long period of underbuilding homes. And experts say that's going to help keep upward pressure on home prices this year. Additionally, since mortgage rates are higher this year than they were last year, buyer demand has slowed.

As the market undergoes this change, its true price appreciation this year won't match the feverish pace in 2021. But the rapid appreciation the market saw last year wasn't sustainable anyway.

What Does That Mean for You?

Today, the market is beginning to move back toward pre-pandemic levels. But even the forecast for 10% home price growth in 2022 is well beyond the 3.8% that's more typical for a normal market.

So, despite what you may have heard, experts say home prices won't fall in most markets. They'll just appreciate more moderately.

If you're worried the house you're trying to sell or the home you want to buy will decrease in value, you should know experts aren't calling for depreciation in most markets, just deceleration. That means your home should still grow in value, just not as fast as it did last year.

Bottom Line

If you're thinking of making a move, you shouldn't wait for prices to fall. Experts say nationally, prices will continue to appreciate this year, just at a more moderate pace. When you're ready to begin the process of buying or selling, let's connect so you have a local market expert on your side each step of the way.

*Keeping Current Matters, Inc. 2022

August
8

When the pandemic hit in 2020, many experts thought the housing market would crash. They feared job loss and economic uncertainty would lead to a wave of foreclosures similar to when the housing bubble burst over a decade ago. Thankfully, the forbearance program changed that. It provided much-needed relief for homeowners so a foreclosure crisis wouldn't happen again. Here's why forbearance worked.

Forbearance enabled nearly five million homeowners to get back on their feet in a time when having the security and protection of a home was more important than ever. Those in need were able to work with their banks and lenders to stay in their homes rather than go into foreclosure. Marina Walsh, Vice President of Industry Analysis at the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), notes:

"Most borrowers exiting forbearance are moving into either a loan modification, payment deferral, or a combination of the two workout options."

As the graph below shows, with modification, deferral, and workout options in place, four out of every five homeowners in forbearance are either paid in full or are exiting with a plan. They're able to stay in their homes.

Why the Forbearance Program Changed the Housing Market | MyKCM

What does this mean for the housing market?

Since so many people can stay in their homes and work out alternative options, there won't be a wave of foreclosures coming to the market. And while rising slightly since the foreclosure moratorium was lifted this year, foreclosures today are still nowhere near the levels seen in the housing crisis.

Forbearance wasn't the only game changer, either. Lending standards have improved significantly since the housing bubble burst, and that's one more thing keeping foreclosure filings low. Today's borrowers are much more qualified to pay their home loans.

And while the majority of homeowners are exiting the forbearance program with a plan, for those who still need to make a change due to financial hardship or other challenges, today's record-level of equity is giving them the opportunity to sell their houses and avoid foreclosure altogether. Homeowners have options they just didn't have in the housing crisis when so many people owed more on their mortgages than their homes were worth. Thanks to their equity and the current undersupply of homes on the market, homeowners can sell their houses, make a move, and not have to go through the foreclosure process that led to the housing market crash in 2008.

Thomas LaSalvia, Chief Economist with Moody's Analytics, states:

"There's some excess savings out there, over 2 trillion worth. . . . There are people that have ownership of those homes right now, that even in a downturn, they'd still likely be able to pay that mortgage and won't have to hand over keys. And there won't be a lot of those distressed sales that happened in the 2008 crisis."

Bottom Line

The forbearance program was a game changer for homeowners in need. It's one of the big reasons why we won't see a wave of foreclosures coming to the market.

Source: Keeping Current Matters, Inc.

August
3

With all the headlines and buzz in the media, some consumers believe the market is in a housing bubble. As the housing market shifts, you may be wondering what'll happen next. It's only natural for concerns to creep in that it could be a repeat of what took place in 2008. The good news is, there's concrete data to show why this is nothing like the last time.

There's a Shortage of Homes on the Market Today, Not a Surplus

The supply of inventory needed to sustain a normal real estate market is approximately six months. Anything more than that is an overabundance and will causes prices to depreciate. Anything less than that is a shortage and will lead to continued price appreciation.

For historical context, there were too many homes for sale during the housing crisis (many of which were short sales and foreclosures), and that caused prices to tumble. Today, supply is growing, but there's still a shortage of inventory available.

The graph below uses data from the National Association of Realtors (NAR) to show how this time compares to the crash. Today, unsold inventory sits at just a 3.0-months' supply at the current sales pace.

3 Graphs To Show This Isn't a Housing Bubble | MyKCM

One of the reasons inventory is still low is because of sustained underbuilding. When you couple that with ongoing buyer demand as millennials age into their peak homebuying years, it continues to put upward pressure on home prices. That limited supply compared to buyer demand is why experts forecast home prices won't fall this time.

Mortgage Standards Were Much More Relaxed During the Crash

During the lead-up to the housing crisis, it was much easier to get a home loan than it is today. The graph below showcases data on the Mortgage Credit Availability Index (MCAI) from the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA). The higher the number, the easier it is to get a mortgage.

3 Graphs To Show This Isn't a Housing Bubble | MyKCM

Running up to 2006, banks were creating artificial demand by lowering lending standards and making it easy for just about anyone to qualify for a home loan or refinance their current home. Back then, lending institutions took on much greater risk in both the person and the mortgage products offered. That led to mass defaults, foreclosures, and falling prices.

Today, things are different, and purchasers face much higher standards from mortgage companies. Mark Fleming, Chief Economist at First American, says:

"Credit standards tightened in recent months due to increasing economic uncertainty and monetary policy tightening." 

Stricter standards, like there are today, help prevent a risk of a rash of foreclosures like there was last time.

The Foreclosure Volume Is Nothing Like It Was During the Crash

The most obvious difference is the number of homeowners that were facing foreclosure after the housing bubble burst. Foreclosure activity has been on the way down since the crash because buyers today are more qualified and less likely to default on their loans. The graph below uses data from ATTOM Data Solutions to help tell the story:

3 Graphs To Show This Isn't a Housing Bubble | MyKCM

In addition, homeowners today are equity rich, not tapped out. In the run-up to the housing bubble, some homeowners were using their homes as personal ATMs. Many immediately withdrew their equity once it built up. When home values began to fall, some homeowners found themselves in a negative equity situation where the amount they owed on their mortgage was greater than the value of their home. Some of those households decided to walk away from their homes, and that led to a wave of distressed property listings (foreclosures and short sales), which sold at considerable discounts that lowered the value of other homes in the area.

Today, prices have risen nicely over the last few years, and that's given homeowners an equity boost. According to Black Knight:

"In total, mortgage holders gained $2.8 trillion in tappable equity over the past 12 months – a 34% increase that equates to more than $207,000 in equity available per borrower. . . ."

With the average home equity now standing at $207,000, homeowners are in a completely different position this time.

Bottom Line

If you're worried we're making the same mistakes that led to the housing crash, the graphs above should help alleviate your concerns. Concrete data and expert insights clearly show why this is nothing like the last time.

*Source: Keeping Current Matters, Inc.